The Bay Area housing market is back on fire… but is it sustainable???

What can we attribute the turnaround in the market too? In simple terms, it’s back to the old supply/demand curve. In the depths of the housing market depression (think back to 2009), many cities were running resale inventories of several hundred homes and typically at least 50% of those homes were in some sort of distressed condition (bank owned, short sale, etc.).

Now, when we look at the market it’s done a complete 180. Inventory levels are down to their lowest levels since the peak of the housing market back in 2005-2006 and the percentage of distressed sales is down significantly from a few years ago. The question everyone should be asking is whether this is sustainable or is the “shadow inventory” of distressed homes about to flood the market and put a damper on things.

In our opinion, given how low the inventory levels are and the strength of most markets, even a doubling in the number of distressed homes on the market will probably not have much of an adverse effect on the market and in some circumstances might actually be helpful. FULL STORY

Source: Steve Reilly, Marketing Consultant, (925) 368-3128

Take a quick look at the inventory and sales levels of many of the East Bay Cities and decide for yourself if we’re in the beginning stages of a long term bull market in housing.

Active Listings Distressed Listings Percent Distressed Avg Monthly Sales Rate Months of Supply Based on 2012   Closed Sales
Antioch 101 55 54% 123 0.82
Brentwood 71 24 34% 82 0.87
Castro Valley 71 12 17% 41 1.72
Concord 73 34 47% 99 0.74
Disco Bay 43 8 19% 24 1.76
Dublin 22 9 41% 27 0.81
Fremont 133 10 8% 122 1.09
Hayward 82 30 37% 97 0.85
Livermore 85 16 19% 82 1.04
Oakley 39 17 44% 46 0.85
Pittsburg 34 19 56% 56 0.61
Pleasanton 67 6 9% 57 1.17
San Leandro 50 12 24% 72 0.69
San Ramon 49 12 24% 61 0.81
Union City 30 13 43% 36 0.83
Walnut Creek 57 2 4% 47 1.23
Advertisements

San Diego: How Banks Helped the Housing Market Get Back On Its Feet

“Shadow Inventory” was a dirty word for most of the past recession with respect to the housing market.  In general terms, it meant there was a large number of homes in foreclosure or soon to be foreclosed upon, which would flood the market and drive down home prices, and keep the housing market on its heels for years to come.  While no one will argue that the sheer volume of foreclosures nationwide and in Southern California is substantial, the threat of flooding the market has not materialized. 

 In San Diego County, as in most areas of Southern California, the Banks were smart and only released foreclosures to the marketplace in measured increments, so as to attract interest in inventory at reduced prices without flooding the market.  San Diego County foreclosures have recently been reported to be down 51% in comparison to a year ago.  As a result, investment groups interested in purchasing large quantities of lower priced foreclosure properties for the strong rental market have helped generate an overall market craving in San Diego County for relatively low-priced housing (generally posture below approximately $500,000).  Brokers active within marketplaces sporting significant volumes of housing priced below $500,000 report multiple offers for any available inventory, often driving up prices.  The average price of new and existing housing sold last month in San Diego County ($335,500), accounted for a 1.7% increase over the average price of homes sold in June of 2011.  The total sales volume in the resale market county-wide for single family detached homes through the first half of 2011 represents almost a 10% increase over the first six months of last year.

 

The market recovery for low-priced housing, coupled with long-standing reduced interest rates, is very slowly beginning to work itself up the price ladder of housing throughout San Diego County.   For example, in higher priced submarkets such as the North County Coastal Area, rates of absorption for new home developments have grown from an average of one sale per month per project last year, to approximately two sales per month in 2012. 

 Although generation of new jobs in San Diego County is headed in the right direction, the slow pace of employment growth has been the major force preventing a rapid recovery in the housing market.  With the potential cut back in government defense spending in San Diego County next year, the pace of job growth is not expected to pick up in the very near term.  However, continued low levels of housing inventory (the number of homes listed for sale at the end of the 1st Quarter of 2012 fell to its lowest level in nearly three years), government maintenance of low interest rates, and continued growth in demand for rental housing is expected to continue to fuel the housing market recovery, but at a continued gradual rate of growth.  Most economic forecasters are predicting housing appreciation in San Diego County in the near term to range between approximately 2% and 3% annually.  The moderate pace of market recovery may be a blessing in disguise; as a more gradual velocity in recovery will give the market its legs for more sustained growth; in contrast to the rapid inflation run-ups of past market cycles which eventually lead to faster boom to bust corrections. 

 Down the road, this bona fide housing recovery at the bottom of the “food chain” so to speak, will likely be looked upon as the flash point which signaled the beginning of the market recovery in the housing market in San Diego County.

 Source: Bob McFarland, Marketing Consultant, (858) 568-7428 ext. 12

RED LIGHT: CA Foreclosures, GREEN LIGHT: Sacramento Arena

California Attorney General Kamala Harris has called on federal mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to place a “good-faith pause” on all foreclosure sales in the state following the multi-state settlement with the nation’s largest banks over mortgage abuses. The nationwide settlement calls for more than $12 billion in relief for struggling California homeowners in the form of principal reductions and short-sales. Read more: California AG calls for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to halt foreclosures

Does this “good-faith pause” help the housing industry?  Will delaying the foreclosure process on thousands of homes prolong the time until the housing market recovers by creating an even bigger backlog of shadow inventory, potentially resulting in continued home price depreciation?  Interesting…   

Sacramento Arena Update:  The City of Sacramento, the NBA and the Sacramento Kings’ organization have come to a tentative agreement to build a new arena in the Sacramento Railyards development, with the potential of keeping the Kings in Sacramento for next 30 years.  This is welcome news for the Sacramento region, especially if the owners of the Railyards develop the area surrounding the proposed new arena. 

If the stars align and a financing plan takes shape, the new arena will be completed the end of 2014.  The development and construction of the entertainment site will provide a host of new jobs, both temporary and permanent.  The project will revive Downtown Sacramento and bring some much-needed life and dollars to the City.

Further, the Kings’ ownership and the City of Sacramento will need to sell the existing Power Balance Pavillion and surrounding property.  The sale should spur new re-development in the Natomas area, which will include a mix of residential, commercial and retail uses.  Given the site’s central location in Natomas and its development history, the property’s sale should garner national attention and interest from developers.

Maloofs pledge to contribute $75 million upfront for new downtown arena

VIDEO: Does Arena Deal Have Council Votes?

VIDEO: Kings owners, Sacramento, NBA reach arena deal

Source: Ryan Long, Senior Marketing Consultant, (916) 784-3329 ext. 16